Acuity suppression

Acuity suppression is the degradation of the sharpness and clarity of vision, resulting in vision becoming partially to completely blurred and indistinct. [1] [2] This effect may affect the entirety of the person's vision or specific sections of it. The experience of acuity suppression is comparable to looking through an out of focus lens which degrades the detail one can see in the external environment. Depending on its intensity, this can often result in a reduced ability to function and perform basic tasks which necessitate the use of sight. Acuity suppression is often accompanied by other coinciding effects such as double vision and pattern recognition suppression. This effect is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of depressant and dissociative compounds, such as alcohol [3] , quetiapine [4] , ketamine [5] , and DXM [6] .

References

  1. Smith, J. L., & Buncic, J. R. (1999). Drugs which can affect near vision: a useful list. American Orthoptic Journal, 49, 180-190. | https://uwpress.wisc.edu/journals/pdfs/AOJ_49_178.pdf
  2. Kunchulia, M., Pilz, K. S., & Herzog, M. H. (2012). How alcohol intake affects visual temporal processing. Vision research, 66, 11-16. | https://doi.org/10.1016/j.visres.2012.06.010

Tags

antipsychotic
depressant
dissociative
sensory
suppression
visual

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