Effect Categories - Cognitive Suppressions

Cognitive suppressions are defined as any subjective effect that decreases the intensity of a facet of a person's cognition.

This page lists the various cognitive suppressions that can occur under the influence of certain psychoactive compounds.


  • Addiction suppression

    Addiction suppression can be described as the experience of a total or partial suppression of a psychological addiction to a specific substance and the cravings associated with it. It is a rare effect that is most commonly associated with psychedelics, psilocin, LSD, ibogaine, and N-acetylcysteine (NAC).

  • Amnesia

    Amnesia is a global impairment in the ability to acquire new memories regardless of sensory modality, and a loss of some memories, especially recent ones, from the period before amnesia began. It is most commonly induced under the influence of heavy dosages of GABAergic depressants, such as alcohol, benzodiazepines, GHB, and zolpidem.

  • Analysis suppression

    Analysis suppression] is a distinct decrease in a person's overall ability to process information and logically or creatively analyze concepts, ideas, and scenarios. It is most commonly induced under the influence of heavy dosages of antipsychotic compounds, and is associated with long term use of such drugs like quetiapine, haloperidol, and risperidone.

  • Anxiety suppression

    Anxiety suppression (also known as anxiolysis or minimal sedation) is medically recognized as a partial to complete suppression of a person’s ability to feel anxiety, general unease, and negative feelings of both psychological and physiological tension. It is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of anxiolytic compounds which primarily include GABAergic depressants, such as benzodiazepines, alcohol, GHB, and gabapentinoids.

  • Cognitive fatigue

    Cognitive fatigue (also called exhaustion, tiredness, lethargy, languidness, languor, lassitude, and listlessness) is medically recognized as a state usually associated with a weakening or depletion of one's mental resources. It is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of antipsychotic compounds, such as quetiapine, haloperidol, and risperidone.

  • Confusion

    Confusion is an impairment of abstract thinking demonstrated by an inability to think with one’s customary clarity and coherence. It is most commonly induced under the influence of heavy dosages of hallucinogenic compounds, such as psychedelics, dissociatives, synthetic cannabinoids, and deliriants.

  • Creativity suppression

    Creativity suppression is a decrease in both a person's motivation and capabilities when performing tasks that involve producing artistic output or novel problem-solving. It is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of antipsychotics.

  • Delirium

    Delirium (also known as acute confusion) is medically recognized as a physiological disturbance of awareness that is accompanied by a change in baseline cognition which cannot be better explained by a preexisting or evolving neurocognitive disorder. The disturbance in awareness is manifested by a reduced ability to direct, focus, sustain, and shift attention and the accompanying cognitive change in at least one other area may include memory and learning (particularly recent memory), disorientation (particularly to time and place), alteration in language, or perceptual distortions or a perceptual-motor disturbance. It is most commonly induced under the influence of heavy dosages of deliriant compounds, such as DPH, datura, and benzydamine.

  • Disinhibition

    Disinhibition is medically recognized as an orientation towards immediate gratification, leading to impulsive behavior driven by current thoughts, feelings, and external stimuli, without regard for past learning or consideration of future consequences. It is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of GABAergic depressants, such as alcohol, benzodiazepines, phenibut, and GHB.

  • Dream suppression

    Dream suppression is a decrease in the vividness, intensity, frequency, and recollection of a person's dreams. It is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of cannabinoids and most types of antidepressants.

  • Emotion suppression

    Emotion suppression (also known as flat affect, apathy, or emotional blunting) is medically recognized as a flattening or decrease in the intensity of one's current emotional state below normal levels. It is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of antipsychotic compounds, such as quetiapine, haloperidol, and risperidone.

  • Focus suppression

    Focus suppression is medically recognized as a decreased ability to selectively concentrate on an aspect of the environment while ignoring other things. It is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate or heavy dosages of antipsychotics, benzodiazepines, cannabinoids, and hallucinogens.

  • Language suppression

    Language suppression (also known as a aphasia) is medically recognized as the decreased ability to use and understand speech. It is most commonly induced under the influence of heavy dosages of antipsychotic compounds, such as quetiapine, haloperidol, and risperidone.

  • Memory suppression

    Memory suppression (also known as ego suppression, ego loss or ego death) is an inhibition of a person's ability to maintain a functional short and long-term memory. It is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of hallucinogenic compounds, such as psychedelics, dissociatives, and deliriants.

  • Motivation suppression

    Motivation suppression (also known as avolition or amotivation) is a decreased desire to initiate or persist in goal-directed behavior. It is most commonly induced under the influence of an acute dosage of an antipsychotic compound, such as quetiapine, haloperidol, and risperidone. However, it is worth noting that chronic treatment with any dose of antipsychotic medication does not cause this effect.

  • Personal bias suppression

    Personal bias suppression (also called cultural filter suppression) is a decrease in the personal or cultural biases, preferences, and associations that a person knowingly or unknowingly filters and interprets their perception of the world through. It is most commonly induced under the influence of heavy dosages of hallucinogens such as dissociatives and psychedelics.

  • Sleepiness

    Sleepiness (also known as drowsiness) is medically recognized as a state of near-sleep, or a strong desire for sleep without feeling a decrease in one's physical energy levels. This state is independent of a circadian rhythm; so, unlike sedation, this effect does not necessarily decrease physical energy levels but instead decreases wakefulness. It is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of a wide variety of compounds such as cannabinoids, GABAergic depressants, opioids, antipsychotics, some antihistamines, and certain psychedelics.

  • Suggestibility suppression

    Suggestibility suppression is a decreased tendency to accept and act on the suggestions of others. It is most commonly induced under the influence of GABAergic depressants.

  • Thought deceleration

    Thought deceleration is the process of thought being slowed down significantly in comparison to that of normal sobriety. It is most commonly induced under the influence of heavy dosages of depressant compounds, such as GABAergics, antipsychotics, and opioids.

  • Thought disorganization

    Thought disorganization is a state in which one's ability to analyze and categorize conceptual information using a systematic and logical thought process is considerably decreased. It is most commonly induced under the influence of heavy dosages of hallucinogenic and depressant compounds, such as dissociatives, psychedelics, cannabinoids, and GABAergics.