Effect Categories - Psychological States

Psychological states are defined as any cognitive effect that is either established within the psychological literature or arises as a result of the complex interplay between more simplistic components such as cognitive enhancements and suppressions.

This page lists the various psychological effects that can occur under the influence of certain psychoactive compounds.


  • Catharsis

    Catharsis is a form of emotional insight. It is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of psychedelic compounds, such as LSD, psilocybin, and mescaline.

  • Deja vu

    Déjà Vu or Deja Vu can be described as the sudden sensation that a current event or situation has already been experienced at some point in the past when, in actuality, it hasn't. It is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of hallucinogenic compounds, such as psychedelics, dissociatives, and cannabinoids.

  • Delusion

    A delusion is a spontaneously occurring false belief held with strong conviction regardless of evidence to the contrary, rational argument, or how much the belief seemingly contradicts the individual's prior understanding of the world. They are most commonly induced under the influence of heavy dosages of hallucinogenic compounds, such as psychedelics, deliriants, and dissociatives.

  • Depersonalization

    Depersonalization is medically recognized as the experience of feeling detached from one's mental processes, body, or actions as if they are an outside observer. It is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of dissociative compounds, such as ketamine, PCP, and DXM.

  • Depression

    Depression can be described as a state of low mood and aversion to activity, which can affect a person's general sense of well-being in a negative manner. Within the context of psychoactive substance usage, depression is most commonly induced when a stimulant or depressant is used repeatedly for prolonged periods of time, during the withdrawal symptoms of almost any substance, or during the comedown/crash of a stimulant.

  • Depression reduction

    Depression reduction is the experience of a lasting minimization of symptoms associated with depression and low mood states. It most commonly occurs at varying levels of efficacy under the influence of a range of different substances, primarily psychedelics or dissociatives.

  • Derealization

    Derealization or is the experience of feeling detached from, and as if one is an outside observer of, one's surroundings (e.g., individuals or objects are experienced as unreal, dreamlike, foggy, lifeless, or visually distorted). It is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of dissociative compounds, such as ketamine, PCP, and DXM.

  • Ego replacement

    Ego replacement can be described as the sudden perception that one's sense of self and personality has been replaced with that of another person's, a fictional character's, an animal's, or an inanimate object's perspective. It is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of heavy dosages of hallucinogenic compounds, such as psychedelics, dissociatives, and deliriants.

  • Feelings of impending doom

    Feelings of impending doom can be described as sudden sensations of overwhelming fear and urgency based upon the unfounded belief that a negative event is about to occur in the immediate future. They are most commonly induced under the influence of heavy dosages of hallucinogenic compounds, such as psychedelics, dissociatives, and deliriants.

  • Introspection

    Introspection can be described as the experience of a state of mind in which a person feels as if they are being encouraged or forced to reflect upon and examine aspects of their life, thoughts, and feelings. It is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of hallucinogenic compounds, such as psychedelics and dissociatives.

  • Jamais vu

    Jamais vu can be described as the sudden sensation that a current event or situation is unfamiliar and being experienced for the very first time. It is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of hallucinogenic compounds, such as psychedelics, dissociatives, and cannabinoids.

  • Mania

    Mania can be described as a state of abnormally elevated energy levels and general arousal. The typical symptoms of mania are the following: heightened mood (either euphoric or irritable), thought acceleration, a flooding of ideas, extreme talkativeness, increased energy, a decreased need for sleep, and hyperactivity. It is most commonly induced under the influence of heavy dosages of stimulant or dissociative compounds, such as methamphetamine, PCP, 2-Oxo-PCE, and cocaine.

  • Mindfulness

    Mindfulness is often broken down into two separate subcomponents that comprise this effect. The first of these components involves the self-regulation of attention so that focus is completely directed towards immediate experience, thereby quietening one's internal narrative and allowing for increased recognition of external and mental events within the present moment. The second of these components involves adopting a particular orientation toward one’s experiences in the present moment that is characterized by a lack of judgement, curiosity, openness, and acceptance. Within meditation, this state of mind is deliberately practised and maintained via the conscious and manual redirection of one's awareness towards a singular point of focus for extended periods of time.

  • Panic attack

    A panic attack is a discrete period of sudden onset of intense fear or terror. During these attacks there are symptoms such as shortness of breath or smothering sensations; palpitations, pounding heart, or accelerated heart rate; chest pain or discomfort; choking; and fear of going crazy or losing control.

  • Paranoia

    Paranoia is the suspiciousness or the belief that one is being harassed, persecuted, or unfairly treated. It is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of hallucinogenic compounds, such as cannabinoids, psychedelics, dissociatives, and deliriants.

  • Personality regression

    Personality regression is a mental state in which one suddenly adopts an identical or similar personality, thought structure, mannerisms and behaviours to that of their past self from a younger age. It is a relatively rare effect that is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of hallucinogenic compounds, such as psychedelics, most notably Ayahuasca, LSD and Ibogaine in particular as well as certain dissociatives.

  • Psychosis

    Psychosis is as an abnormal condition of the mind and a general psychiatric term for a mental state in which one experiences a "loss of contact with reality." It is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of hallucinogenic compounds, such as deliriants, psychedelics, dissociatives, and cannabinoids.

  • Rejuvenation

    Rejuvenation can be described as feelings of mild to extreme cognitive refreshment which are felt during the afterglow of certain compounds. It is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of hallucinogenic compounds, such as psychedelics and dissociatives.

  • Suicidal ideation

    Suicidal ideation can be described as the experience of compulsive suicidal thoughts and a general desire to end one's own life. It is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of various antidepressants of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor class.