Effect Categories - Novel Cognitive States

Novel cognitive states are defined as any cognitive effect that does not merely amplify or suppress familiar states of mind; rather, it induces an experience that is qualitatively different from that of ordinary consciousness.

Although many transpersonal and psychological effects also technically fit into this definition, they are excluded from this category as they have their own defining qualities that standard novel states do not.

This page lists the various novel cognitive states that can occur under the influence of certain psychoactive compounds.


  • Autonomous voice communication

    Autonomous voice communication is the experience of being able to hear and converse with a disembodied and audible voice of unknown origin which seemingly resides within one's own head. It is most commonly induced under the influence of heavy dosages of hallucinogenic compounds such as psychedelics, dissociatives, and deliriants.

  • Cognitive dysphoria

    Cognitive dysphoria (semantically the opposite of euphoria) is medically recognized as a cognitive and emotional state in which a person experiences intense feelings of dissatisfaction, and in some cases indifference to the world around them. It is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of deliriant compounds, such as DPH and datura. However, it can also occur during a stimulant's offset and during the withdrawal symptoms of almost any substance.

  • Cognitive euphoria

    Cognitive euphoria (semantically the opposite of cognitive dysphoria) is medically recognized as a cognitive and emotional state in which a person experiences intense feelings of well-being, elation, happiness, excitement, and joy. It is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of opioids, entactogens, stimulants, and GABAergic depressants. However, it can also occur to a lesser extent under the influence of hallucinogenic compounds such as psychedelics, dissociatives, and cannabinoids.

  • Component controllability

    Component controllability is the rare experience of gaining partial or complete conscious control over the details, content, and intensity of other currently occurring subjective effects. It is a very rare experience that most commonly induced under the influence of heavy dosages of psychedelic compounds, such as LSD, psilocybin, and mescaline.

  • Compulsive redosing

    Compulsive redosing is the experience of a powerful and difficult to resist urge to continuously redose a psychoactive substance in an effort to increase or maintain the subjective effects which it induces. It is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of a wide variety of compounds, such as opioids, stimulants, GABAergics, and entactogens.

  • Conceptual thinking

    Conceptual thinking is an alteration to the nature and content of one's internal thought stream. This alteration predisposes a user to think thoughts that are no longer primarily comprised of words and linear sentence structures. Instead, thoughts become equally comprised of what is perceived to be extremely detailed renditions of the innately understandable and internally stored concepts that words exist to label. It is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of hallucinogenic compounds, such as psychedelics and dissociatives.

  • Enhancement and suppression cycles

    Enhancement and suppression cycles is an effect which results in two opposite states of mind that do not occur simultaneously but instead swap between each other at seemingly random intervals. The first of these two alternate states can be described as the experience of cognitive enhancements which feel is if they drastically improve the person's ability to think clearly. The second of these two alternate states can be described as the experience of a range of cognitive suppressions which feel as if they drastically inhibit the person's ability to think clearly. They are most commonly induced under the influence of heavy dosages of psychedelic tryptamines, such as psilocybin, ayahuasca, and 4-AcO-DMT.

  • Glossolalia

    Glossolalia is an effect in which a person finds themselves involuntarily speaking and/or thinking in nonsensical speech which is structured in a manner that resembles an actual language. It is most commonly induced under the influence of heavy dosages of hallucinogenic compounds, such as psychedelics, deliriants, and dissociatives.

  • Mixed emotions

    Mixed emotions is the experience of feeling multiple emotions simultaneously without an obvious external trigger. They are most commonly induced under the influence of heavy dosages of psychedelic compounds, such as LSD, psilocybin, and mescaline.

  • Multiple thought streams

    Multiple thought streams is a state of mind in which a person has more than one internal narrative or stream of consciousness simultaneously occurring within their head. They are most commonly induced under the influence of heavy dosages of psychedelic compounds, such as LSD, psilocybin, and mescaline.

  • Spontaneous bodily sensations

    Spontaneous tactile sensations are the experience of sensations across the body occurring without any obvious or immediate physical trigger. This results in feelings of seemingly random but distinct tingling sensations that occur across the skin and within the body. They are most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of psychedelic compounds, such as LSD, psilocybin, and mescaline. However, they can also occur under the influence of stimulants, cannabinoids, and dissociatives.

  • Thought loops

    A thought loop is the experience of becoming trapped within a chain of thoughts, actions and emotions which repeats itself over and over again in a cyclic loop. Thought loops are most commonly induced under the influence of heavy dosages of hallucinogenic compounds, such as psychedelics and dissociatives. However, they can also occur to a lesser extent under the influence of extremely heavy dosages of stimulants and benzodiazepines.

  • Time distortion

    Time distortion is an effect that makes the passage of time feel wildly distorted and difficult to keep track of. It is usually felt in two different forms: time dilation and time compression. These are most commonly induced under the influence of heavy dosages of hallucinogenic compounds, such as psychedelics, dissociatives, entactogens, and cannabinoids.