Effect Categories - Visual Suppressions

Visual suppressions are defined as any subjective effect that decreases a person's ability to perceive the external environment through their sense of sight.

This page lists the various visual suppressions that can occur under the influence of certain psychoactive compounds.


  • Acuity suppression

    Acuity suppression is the degradation of the sharpness and clarity of vision, resulting in vision becoming partially to completely blurred and indistinct. This effect is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of depressant and dissociative compounds, such as alcohol, quetiapine, ketamine, and DXM.

  • Colour suppression

    Colour suppression is the experience of colours becoming darker, less saturated, and less distinguishable from one another. It is most commonly induced under the influence of heavy dosages of antipsychotic compounds, such as quetiapine, haloperidol, and risperidone.

  • Double vision

    Double vision is the experience of seeing duplicated vision, similar to that which occurs when one crosses their eyes. This effect is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of depressant and dissociative compounds, such as alcohol, quetiapine, ketamine, and DXM.

  • Frame rate suppression

    Frame rate suppression is the perceived reduction in speed at which visual information is processed. It is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of dissociative compounds, such as ketamine, MXE, PCP, and DXM.

  • Pattern recognition suppression

    Pattern recognition suppression is a partial to complete inability to mentally process visual information regardless of its clarity. It is most commonly induced under the influence of heavy dosages of dissociative or antipsychotic compounds, such as ketamine, quetiapine, PCP, and DXM.

  • Peripheral information misinterpretation

    Peripheral information misinterpretation is a fleeting experience of an object or detail within one's peripheral vision being interpreted and displayed incorrectly. It is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of deliriant compounds, such as DPH, datura, and benzydamine.