Effect Categories - Smell and Taste effects

Smell and taste effects are defined as any subjective effect that directly alters either a person's sense of smell or taste.

This page lists the various smell and taste effects that can occur under the influence of certain psychoactive compounds.


  • Gustatory enhancement

    Gustatory enhancement is the experience of tastes becoming significantly richer, stronger, and more noticeable than that of everyday sobriety. It is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of psychedelic compounds, such as LSD, psilocybin, and mescaline. However, it can also occur under the influence of cannabinoids and stimulants

  • Gustatory hallucination

    A gustatory hallucination is any hallucination which involves the sense of taste. A common example of this is a strong, unpleasant metallic taste in one's mouth. They are most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of hallucinogenic compounds, such as psychedelics, dissociatives, and deliriants.

  • Gustatory suppression

    Gustatory suppression is the experience of tastes becoming significantly vaguer, weaker, and less noticeable than that of everyday sobriety. At higher levels, this can result in food becoming completely tasteless and significantly less appealing. It is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of dissociative compounds, such as ketamine, PCP, and DXM.

  • Olfactory enhancement

    Olfactory enhancement (also known as hyperosmia) is the experience of smells becoming significantly richer, stronger, and more noticeable than that of everyday sobriety. This experience can either be positive or negative depending on the smell and the person's prior opinion of them. For example, while certain smells such as food or flowers may become a true delight during this experience, other smells such as pollution or body odour may become overpowering in an uncomfortable manner which can potentially trigger nausea and vomiting.

  • Olfactory hallucination

    An olfactory hallucination (also known as phantosmia) is the detection or perception of a convincing imaginary smell that is not actually present in the person's environment. They are most commonly induced under the influence of heavy dosages of hallucinogenic compounds, such as deliriants and psychedelics.