Effect Categories - Auditory Effects

Auditory effects are defined as any subjective effect that directly alters a person's sense of hearing.

This page lists the various auditory effects that can occur under the influence of certain psychoactive compounds.


  • Auditory distortion

    An auditory distortion is the experience of perceived alterations in how audible noises present and structure themselves. They are most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of psychedelic compounds, such as LSD, 5-MeO-DiPT, and DMT.

  • Auditory enhancement

    An auditory enhancement is the experience of an increase or improvement of the acuteness and clarity of sound. They are most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of psychedelic compounds, such as LSD, psilocybin, and mescaline.

  • Auditory hallucination

    An auditory hallucination is the experience of hearing spontaneous and imaginary noises. They are most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of hallucinogenic compounds, such as psychedelics, deliriants, and dissociatives.

  • Auditory misinterpretation

    Auditory misinterpretation is the fleeting experience of a sound or noise being mistaken as something else. It is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of deliriant compounds, such as DPH, datura, and benzydamine.

  • Auditory suppression

    Auditory suppression is the experience of sound becoming perceived as more distant, quiet, and muffled than they actually are. It is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of dissociative compounds, such as ketamine, PCP, and DXM.