Effect Categories - Disconnective Effects

Disconnective effects are defined as any subjective effect that feels as if it disconnects one from the external environment, their senses, and/or their consciousness.

These effects are typically associated with dissociative hallucinogens and likely occur due to the way in which these compounds function as NMDA receptor antagonists. This means they bind to receptors in the brain but do not activate them, thus blocking other neurotransmitters from doing so. The result is a dose-dependent decrease in the passing of electrical signals across the brain and an overall disconnection of neurons, which leads to states of disconnection between conscious parts of the brain and its sensory organs.

This page lists the various disconnective effects that can occur under the influence of certain psychoactive compounds.


  • Cognitive disconnection

    Cognitive disconnection is the experience of feeling distant and detached from one's sense of identity, thought stream, and general cognitive processes. It is a near-universal effect under the influence of moderate dosages of dissociative compounds, such as ketamine, PCP, and DXM.

  • Physical disconnection

    Physical disconnection is the experience of feeling distant and detached from one's sense of touch and their feelings of ownership and control over their own physical body. This effect is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of depressant and dissociative compounds, such as, ketamine, PCP, and DXM.

  • Visual disconnection

    Visual disconnection is the experience of becoming distanced and/or detached from one's sense of vision. This experience can create a wide range of subjective changes to a person's perception of their own vision, some of which include hallucinatory structures and holes, spaces, or voids (the K-hole).