Effect Categories - Cerebrovascular Effects

Cerebrovascular effects are defined as any uncomfortable physical effect that relates to the brain and its blood vessels.

This page lists the various cerebrovascular effects that can occur under the influence of certain psychoactive compounds.


  • Brain zaps

    Brain zaps can be described as sharp electrical shock sensations which originate within the head or brain and sometimes extend throughout the body. They are most commonly induced under the influence of withdrawal, dose reduction, and discontinuation of antidepressant drugs, including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) such as sertraline, paroxetine, and venlafaxine.

  • Dizziness

    Dizziness can be described as the perception of a spinning or swaying motion which typically causes a difficulty in standing or walking. It is most commonly induced under the influence of heavy dosages of GABAergic depressant compounds, such as benzodiazepines, alcohol, and GHB.

  • Headache

    A headache can be described as a pain anywhere in the region of the head or neck. It can be a symptom of a number of different conditions. They are most commonly induced under the influence of heavy dosages of stimulating compounds, such as traditional stimulants, certain psychedelics, and certain dissociatives.

  • Increased bodily temperature

    Increased bodily temperature or pyrexia can be described as having a body temperature which is above normal baseline. It is most commonly induced under the influence of heavy dosages of stimulant compounds which affect serotonin and 5-HT receptors, dopamine and D receptors and norepinephrine.

  • Seizure

    An epileptic seizure (colloquially a fit) can be described as a brief episode of signs and/or symptoms which are due to abnormal, excessive, or synchronous neuronal activity in the brain. They are most commonly induced under the influence of withdrawals from prolonged chronic benzodiazepine or alcohol usage.

  • Temperature regulation suppression

    Temperature regulation suppression can be defined as an inability to maintain a normal temperature. It is most commonly induced under the influence of heavy dosages of stimulating psychedelic compounds, such as LSD, 2C-B, and AMT.